Mouse Monoclonal Antibody to HLA-C

Item Information
Catalog #Size/ConcentrationPrice
Specification
AliasesMHC; HLAC; HLC-C; D6S204; PSORS1; HLA-JY3
Clone#3H3A5
Entrez GenelD3107
FormulationPurified antibody in PBS with 0.05% sodium azide
HostMouse
IsotypeIgG1
ImmunogenPurified recombinant fragment of human HLA-C (AA: 25-308) expressed in E. Coli.
MW40.6kDa
Application
ELISA1/10000
ICC (Immunocytochemistry)1/50 - 1/200
IHC_P(Immunohistochemistry)1/200 - 1/1000
FCM (Flow Cytometry)1/200 - 1/400
WB (Western Blot)1/500 - 1/2000
Sequence
25-308
Catalog#: 32260
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Images
Elisa
Figure 1:Black line: Control Antigen (100 ng);Purple line: Antigen (10ng); Blue line: Antigen (50 ng); Red line:Antigen (100 ng)
Figure 1:Black line: Control Antigen (100 ng);Purple line: Antigen (10ng); Blue line: Antigen (50 ng); Red line:Antigen (100 ng)
Western Blot
Figure 2:Western blot analysis using HLA-C mAb against human HLA-C (AA: 25-308) recombinant protein. (Expected MW is 35.4 kDa)
Figure 2:Western blot analysis using HLA-C mAb against human HLA-C (AA: 25-308) recombinant protein. (Expected MW is 35.4 kDa)
Western Blot
Figure 3:Western blot analysis using HLA-C mAb against HEK293-6e (1) and HLA-C (AA: 25-308)-hIgGFc transfected HEK293-6e (2) cell lysate.
Figure 3:Western blot analysis using HLA-C mAb against HEK293-6e (1) and HLA-C (AA: 25-308)-hIgGFc transfected HEK293-6e (2) cell lysate.
Immunofluorescence analysis
Figure 4:Immunofluorescence analysis of Hela cells using HLA-C mouse mAb (green). Blue: DRAQ5 fluorescent DNA dye. Red: Actin filaments have been labeled with Alexa Fluor- 555 phalloidin. Secondary antibody from Fisher (Cat#: 35503)
Figure 4:Immunofluorescence analysis of Hela cells using HLA-C mouse mAb (green). Blue: DRAQ5 fluorescent DNA dye. Red: Actin filaments have been labeled with Alexa Fluor- 555 phalloidin. Secondary antibody from Fisher (Cat#: 35503)
Flow cytometric analysis
Figure 5:Flow cytometric analysis of THP-1 cells using HLA-C mouse mAb (green) and negative control (red).
Figure 5:Flow cytometric analysis of THP-1 cells using HLA-C mouse mAb (green) and negative control (red).
Immunohistochemical analysis
Figure 6:Immunohistochemical analysis of paraffin-embedded lung cancer tissues using HLA-C mouse mAb with DAB staining.
Figure 6:Immunohistochemical analysis of paraffin-embedded lung cancer tissues using HLA-C mouse mAb with DAB staining.
Immunohistochemical analysis
Figure 7:Immunohistochemical analysis of paraffin-embedded liver cancer tissues using HLA-C mouse mAb with DAB staining.
Figure 7:Immunohistochemical analysis of paraffin-embedded liver cancer tissues using HLA-C mouse mAb with DAB staining.
Product Overview
Description

HLA-C belongs to the HLA class I heavy chain paralogues. This class I molecule is a heterodimer consisting of a heavy chain and a light chain (beta-2 microglobulin). The heavy chain is anchored in the membrane. Class I molecules play a central role in the immune system by presenting peptides derived from endoplasmic reticulum lumen. They are expressed in nearly all cells. The heavy chain is approximately 45 kDa and its gene contains 8 exons. Exon one encodes the leader peptide, exons 2 and 3 encode the alpha1 and alpha2 domain, which both bind the peptide, exon 4 encodes the alpha3 domain, exon 5 encodes the transmembrane region, and exons 6 and 7 encode the cytoplasmic tail. Polymorphisms within exon 2 and exon 3 are responsible for the peptide binding specificity of each class one molecule. Typing for these polymorphisms is routinely done for bone marrow and kidney transplantation. About 6000 HLA-C alleles have been described. The HLA system plays an important role in the occurrence and outcome of infectious diseases, including those caused by the malaria parasite, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). The structural spike and the nucleocapsid proteins of the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, which causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), are reported to contain multiple Class I epitopes with predicted HLA restrictions. Individual HLA genetic variation may help explain different immune responses to a virus across a population.

References (references)
References (references)1.J Dermatol Sci. 2020 Jul;99(1):23-29.2.Sci Rep. 2020 Jul 24;10(1):12424.